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(@cpollino)
Contributor
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 1
April 4, 2020 5:41 am  

Not sure where to post this, i have found this on KS today :

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/edcano/sandsara/faqs

 

might be worth looking into it.

 

 


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(@bruce)
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 289
April 4, 2020 10:39 am  

We've been aware of it since their first launch in 2018 (they cancelled it). It uses a different mechanism (SCARA). Not the first copy of the idea, nor likely the last. Will be interesting to see how their fulfillment and support go (I backed a super early bird).


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(@heropup)
Contributor
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 25
April 4, 2020 3:55 pm  

Hi Bustok,

While both products are based on the same concept, they are very different. Our mechanism is unique in the sense that it allows a much smaller and streamlined outer shape as well as a larger sand bed. You can find more details towards the bottom of our campaign where we talk about polar vs SCARA design.

Also check out "Zen Table" by Simon Hallam, he was one of the first ones to commercialize the concept a few years before Sisyphus, but he used a cartesian design. We believe SCARA is superior to both cartesian and polar and a much more elegant solution that opens the door to very unique possibilities, like our Stelle design, which would be impossible with either one of the other mechanism types.

This was one of the responses to the comments in the campaign, and I found it a bit disingenuous, to say the least, because the underlying concept and mechanism for Sisyphus predates the Zen Table by at least a decade.  Granted, art is very often a process of innovation through appropriation--to take something that has existed before, and build upon and transform it--and we all "borrow" ideas from each other, but I think to not acknowledge the well-documented history of this remarkable product is a disservice to its creator.

I come from an academic and scientific background, where citation, attribution, and recognition of the ideas and work upon which new discoveries rely, is not only morally and ethically proper, but is in fact necessary in order to be able to reproduce and validate results.  There is no shame in crediting others who laid the path that you took in your journey to place your own stepping stone.  When that doesn't happen, it suggests to me a level of insecurity that reflects a fear of being labeled a copycat.


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(@bruce)
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 289
April 5, 2020 9:08 am  

@heropup - Thanks for so eloquently expressing these sentiments. It certainly impacts me when I see copying of my work without attribution - but it is something I've experienced ever since I showed Eggbot and Sisyphus at the first Maker Faire in San Mateo, in 2006.  Often, it's engineers who look at my stuff  simply as a fun challenge to recreate, and are oblivious to the "art" part. But it's the art side that has been, and will always be my driving force, not recognition. More people experiencing motion control art - either as consumers or creators - remains the goal.


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